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7 UpFront: Advice on protecting our mental health during COVID-19

7 UpFront: Protecting our mental health during COVID-19
Posted at 9:29 PM, Nov 24, 2020
and last updated 2020-11-24 21:29:27-05
(WXYZ) —

We're focusing on mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic in tonight's 7 UpFront segment.

The past 9 months have taken quite the toll on all of us, and we're being joined by licensed therapist Kenneth Coleman to talk about how we all can deal with it.

You can see the full interview in the video player above.

"A lot of practitioners have gone to some form of telehealth or virtual care, so they can call and have an appointment, either through Zoom or some other platform they might be using for their clients," Coleman says. "That's a safe platform where they're still maintaining that patients confidentiality. If it's beyond that, there are still emergency rooms, the majority of hospital have in place protocols so. as you enter their facilities, you're going to be safe as you access care.'

"Care is still available, therapists are still available," Coleman says. "Most counties still have their hotlines up and running, so help is available."

"Each day, when you get up, have a plan for that day," he says. "Have a plan for things you want to do that's gonna bring you a sense of completeness, some sense of joy, a sense of happiness. Because, the more things that you're doing that create a sense of normalcy for you ongoing, helps manage that tension, helps manage anxiety, helps manage that depression, so that one small thing is your focus, focus on what you're going to do that particular day. And, for whatever reason, if it doesn't occur, remember you still have tomorrow, but you're still focusing on today."

"You can't actually control what other people are going to do," Coleman says, "You can't control the environment, you can't control the weather. But one thing you can always control is you. You can control how you process your information. You can control how you decide to being to interact with other people. And, also, what your thought process looks like. I think that's the healthiest way people can manage mental health."